Louisville’s new cops are ready to take to the streets. While Wednesday’s graduating class is small, it adds officers at a time when the department is in desperate need of help. Proud in their patrol uniforms, the 16 officers making up the new LMPD promotion were welcomed and celebrated Wednesday at the Iroquois amphitheater. “Your success will be determined by your listening skills,” Chef Erika Shields told the class. “Your ability to communicate. Your ability to empathize.” Officers start at a time when trust between the community and law enforcement is low. A 2020 Gallup poll showed the lowest trust in police in the history of the investigation. “We have to get it right”: the police chief says the LMPD is making progress on necessary reforms. “Both in terms of our black and brown populations represented here, but three of the recruits also have globalization, so it really represents who is as a city and where we grow up,” said Mayor Greg Fischer. Of the 16 officers, one was born in a Kenyan refugee camp, one is from Liberia and one is from Ukraine. Five have military experience, two of which are currently in service. Three others have previous law enforcement experience, two have previous emergency / emergency services experience, and Class President Ali Thomas is a retired member of the Louisville Fire Department. Ongoing Coverage: LMPD Reduces Service Staff For Most Special Events Due To Staff Levels “I want to provide service to people that a lot of people feel is lacking,” Thomas said. “I want to be caring. Coming from the fireside, we interact with the community a little differently. It’s always smiles and hugs and I would like to bring that side to the community. When we used to stop by in the big red truck, people didn’t care if we were black, white, mexican. they just wanted help and i feel like it’s the same with the police department. from me, when people call 911 or call us, they just want someone who is. I’m gonna come over there and take care of them and help them and that’s what I’m here for. “That’s what I’m here for.” is my home, “McClain said.” This is where my family is. This is where my friends are and I wanted to do something to make them feel safe and I felt that being on the street would make them feel safe. Be that extra person who makes someone feel comfortable. It makes a person feel like if I show up, they know they will be okay. Chief Erika Shields left the officers with these words as they began their work in the community: ‘I need leaders. I need people who are willing to go out into the community, hear the community, and don’t care. And when you can, we’ll all win. We have it. May God be with you. “The department currently has 299 sworn vacancies and 89 civilian vacancies.

Louisville’s new cops are ready to take to the streets.

While Wednesday’s graduating class is small, it adds officers at a time when the department is in desperate need of help.

Proud in their patrol uniforms, the 16 officers making up the new LMPD promotion were welcomed and celebrated Wednesday at the Iroquois amphitheater.

“Your success will be determined by your listening skills,” Chef Erika Shields told the class. “Your ability to communicate. Your ability to empathize.”

Officers start at a time when trust between the community and law enforcement is low. A 2020 Gallup poll showed the lowest trust in police in the history of the investigation.

“You have to do it right”: Police chief says LMPD is making progress on much-needed reforms

That’s why city leaders were pleased with the diversity of the new force members, believing that they resemble the community they have now sworn to protect.

“Both in terms of our black and brown populations represented here, but three of the recruits also have globalization, so it really represents who is as a city and where we grow up,” said Mayor Greg Fischer.

Of the 16 officers, one was born in a Kenyan refugee camp, one is from Liberia and one is from Ukraine. Five have military experience, two of which are currently in service. Three others have previous law enforcement experience, two have previous emergency / emergency services experience, and Class President Ali Thomas is a retired member of the Louisville Fire Department.

Continuous coverage: LMPD cuts back on duty for most special events due to staffing levels

“I want to provide a service to people that a lot of people feel is missing,” Thomas said. “I want to be caring. Coming from the fireside, we interact with the community a little differently. It’s always smiles and hugs and I would like to bring that side to the community. When we used to stop by in the big red truck, people didn’t care if we were black, white, mexican. they just wanted help and i feel like it’s the same with the police department. from me, when people call 911 or call us, they just want someone who is I’m gonna come over there and take care of them and help them and that’s what I’m here for. “

It’s a community that Champayne McClain’s only rookie felt the need to serve.

“This is my house,” McClain said. “This is where my family is. This is where my friends are and I wanted to do something to make them feel safe and I felt like being on the street would make them feel safe. Be that extra person that makes a person feel comfortable. It makes a person feel like if I show up, they know they’re going to be okay. “

Chief Erika Shields left the officers with these words as they began their work in the community: “I need leaders. I need people who are ready to go into the community, to hear from the community, and I will all win. We have this. May God be with you. “

The department currently has 299 sworn vacancies and 89 civilian vacancies.


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